Tag Archives: mental health

Law Student Voices: Finding Balance in Law School

 

Image courtesy of chanpipat/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of chanpipat/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

One of the most difficult tasks for a law student at any stage of law school is to find balance. It is easy to succumb to the many long hours of studying and school-related activities. However, focusing on law school to the exclusion of everything else can be a recipe for disaster. One key ingredient to law school success is taking affirmative steps to care for your mental and physical health.

In our first year legal writing class, we were taught the importance of incubation. Incubation is a period of time, after saturating your brain with research, when you go do something non-law related to allow your brain to make the subconscious connections that cannot be made while actively thinking about a problem. Allowing your brain to quiet for a short period of time can lead to that pivotal moment where the solution to your problem becomes clear. Personally, I took this advice and applied it to all aspects of law school. When life gets overwhelming, I do something active—usually running—in order to re-group and recharge. I also run one mile with a friend before every exam. This helps us to get out some of our physical anxiety and gives us a few minutes for mental preparation. Each person has to choose an activity that fits their life. Even though running is what works for me, for others it may be meditation, yoga, creative writing, reading for pleasure, going on a date with your significant other, seeing a movie, etc.— anything enjoyable that is not law-school related. Obviously, this technique will not work if you let it take away from your studies. But allowing yourself a short break will keep your brain sharp and fresh, ready to dominate the mental gymnastics of law school.

It’s also important for law students to pay attention to their sleep and diet. Busy schedules and dedication to excellence can lead to poor eating and sleeping habits. These two things are very important to mental health. It will be more difficult to pay attention in class or create outlines if you are exhausted. You will spend your energy trying to stay awake rather than absorbing the material. Sleeping enough and eating well will keep your energy up and provide the endurance to keep pushing forward on your law school journey.

My colleagues frequently ask how I have time to run with all the demands of law school. My answer is always the same, how can I not? I know I owe it to myself to take care of my body and my mind, so I find the time. This is my challenge to you: Take care of yourselves, make the time!

This post was authored by Amanda M. Fisher, J.D., Savannah Law School ’15.

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Filed under General, Law Student Voices, Stress and Mental Health

Surviving Law School Bullies

Today I want to talk about one of the uglier aspects of the law school experience–law school bullying. We’ve all had experience with bullying, whether as a victim, a witness to bullying incidents, or even as a bully yourself. The competitive law school environment can feed bullying. Students are targeted by bullies for a number of reasons, including their academic strengths or weaknesses (real or perceived); physical appearance or characteristics; race, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or ethnicity; physical disabilities; learning disabilities; mental health; or any other of a host of reasons. As we’ve learned from media coverage of issues related to bullying, such as Anderson Cooper’s documentary special, The Bully Effect, on CNN, the consequences of bullying can be devastating. Bullying can demoralize, humiliate, and isolate its victims. It can affect your mental health, motivation to be in law school, confidence in your own abilities, and desire to interact with those around you. I’m not saying that you should not feel upset or be affected by bullying–your feelings are valid and important. But there are things that you can do as a law student to survive–even thrive–despite the bullying. So if you are bullied by your law school classmates, what can you do about it? Here are a few (nonexclusive) suggestions:

First, understand that you are not alone. You are not the only law student who has been bullied. There’s a reason why I felt that writing this post was important, and that’s because so many students experience it. Moreover, it’s important to understand that not everyone is against you. Bullies are vocal and, as a result, tend to make us feel like everyone thinks the same way about us. But, in reality, bullies are a minority. They don’t speak for most students. Be careful not to adopt an “everyone is against me mentality.”

Second, help is out there. You don’t have to go through bullying alone. There are people at your law school who will support you if you reach out to them–professors, deans, academic support professionals, counselors. We don’t want our law schools to be a climate in which bullying is acceptable, and we will do whatever we can to support you and stop the bullying. But we’re not always in a position to see bullying firsthand. Give us the opportunity to help you and others by letting us know what is going on. We also know of additional resources that may be helpful to you if bullying affects your ability to focus on your academic success and mental and physical wellbeing. We want you to succeed–not just in law school but in life. Take advantage of our willingness to help.

Third, remind yourself that, although bullying is very personal to you (of course it is–how can it not be, when you’re the one feeling its effects?), it often reflects the bully’s personal insecurities as well. Many bullies try to feel better about their own insecurities by putting other people down. In that way, they are really signaling to you how they feel about themselves, rather than how they feel about you. Although it may not make bullying any more pleasant, and it certainly doesn’t make it any more acceptable, that understanding can help you to maintain a sense of perspective so that you can move beyond the bullying experience and focus on your own academic and professional success.

I also want to speak to those witnesses of law school bullying. Don’t stay silent when you see bullying taking place. Speak up! Don’t tolerate bullying among your fellow students. You are our future lawyers–if you do not stand up in these types of situations, who will? And even if you do not feel comfortable speaking out, at least reach out to fellow students who have been bullied and show them that they are not alone.

Finally, a word for law school bullies: Bullying is not acceptable for anyone, but certainly not for future lawyers. It does not reflect the personal character demanded by our profession.

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Filed under General, Stress and Mental Health